Difference between revisions of "Windows Blackcomb"

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|name=Windows "Blackcomb"
 
|name=Windows "Blackcomb"
 
|codename=Blackcomb
 
|codename=Blackcomb
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|image=WindowsBlackcomb-7.0.2698-Desktop.jpg
 
|family=nt
 
|family=nt
 
|replaces=[[Windows XP]]<br>[[Windows Longhorn]]<br>[[Windows Server 2003]]
 
|replaces=[[Windows XP]]<br>[[Windows Longhorn]]<br>[[Windows Server 2003]]
 
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'''Windows "Blackcomb"''' was the codename for a version of Windows originally meant to be released in the second half of 2002 as a successor to [[Windows XP]].<ref>https://betanews.com/2000/02/10/microsoft-outlines-plans-for-whistler-and-blackcomb/</ref><ref>https://www.zdnet.com/article/gates-net-operating-systems-on-tap/</ref>
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'''Windows "Blackcomb"''' was the codename for a version of Windows originally meant to be released in the second half of 2002 as a successor to [[Windows XP]].<ref>https://betanews.com/2000/02/10/microsoft-outlines-plans-for-whistler-and-blackcomb/</ref><ref>https://www.zdnet.com/article/gates-net-operating-systems-on-tap/</re
  
 
==History==
 
==History==

Revision as of 14:49, 26 March 2019

Windows "Blackcomb"
Version of Microsoft Windows
WindowsBlackcomb-7.0.2698-Desktop.jpg
OS familyWindows NT
Version
CodenameBlackcomb
Preliminary name
Architecture
Latest build
Release date
Support end
Replaces
Windows XP
Windows Longhorn
Windows Server 2003

Windows "Blackcomb" was the codename for a version of Windows originally meant to be released in the second half of 2002 as a successor to Windows XP.[1]Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag By the middle of 2003, Longhorn has acquired many features features originally intended for Blackcomb. As a result, the release date for both projects was postponed even further.

When Microsoft announced the cancellation of Longhorn Server in late 2002, the name Blackcomb became synonymous with the successor of Windows .NET Server 2003.[2] This was in line with Microsoft's vision for Blackcomb - by 2004 most, if not all, of the user experience ideas have been moved to Longhorn, and server-side features, such as improvements to the Dynamic Systems Initiative, became the main focus of Blackcomb.[3] Despite this, certain Longhorn features were postponed back to Blackcomb after Longhorn's development reset in 2004, one such example being WinFS.[4]

In early 2006, as Windows Vista was being finished, Blackcomb was renamed to Vienna and eventually became Windows 7, having little to nothing in common with the original ideology.

Presentation

There is a supposed presentation of Windows Blackcomb floating around the internet, however the focus of that demonstration was actually MSN Messenger. As a result, many features never intended for Windows Blackcomb have been attributed to it by various news sources.[5]

Builds

References